Methyl methacrylate magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for gluten determination

Authors

  • D Limthin king mongkut's institute of technology ladkrabang
  • K Chattrairat king mongkut's institute of technology ladkrabang
  • P Leepheng king mongkut's institute of technology ladkrabang
  • S Wisutthipat king mongkut's institute of technology ladkrabang
  • P Gansa king mongkut's institute of technology ladkrabang
  • A Klamchuen National Nanotechnology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency
  • D Phromyothin King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang

Abstract

The gluten protein is found in some rice and flour. The allergy of gluten, a little bit of gluten in diet cause long-term damage and dangerous to the body. Even tiny amounts of gluten in diet may bring enormous symptoms. The rapid and simple method for gluten detection is molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) combined with electrochemical analysis. In addition, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIP) as known as Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have used in combination with electrochemical measurement as well to improve the sensitivity of detection. In this work, the MMIP was combined with electrochemical technique. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reaction and then encapsulated with methyl methacrylate (MMA) as a functional group for gluten detection. Dynamic light scattering measurement clearly illustrates the average size of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles as low as 150 nm. Chemical bonding, morphology, crystal structure and magnetic properties were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively.

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Published

2019-03-29

How to Cite

[1]
D. Limthin, “Methyl methacrylate magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for gluten determination”, J. Met. Mater. Miner., vol. 29, no. 1, Mar. 2019.

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles